The Joe Vig Top 40

Critic Joe Viglione reviews movies, books, DVDs, CDs, and has all sorts of opinions on a variety of things. The monthly Top 40 is a sort-of directory... commentaries and essays expand the thought process on RockJournalistJoeVig.blogspot.com ...so the reviews on the Top 40 aren't final, they are just the starting point to more discussion. You can always contact Joe directly at visual_radio [@] yahoo.com

Monday, January 04, 2016

 

January Top 40 2016 Richie Parsons "Mix Tape"

             Welcome to the Top 40 for January 2016

                                                                                    Editor Joe Viglione


This will be a "double-issue" with special mentions of great discs from the past two years along with the new material being sent to Ultrabox 2392, Woburn, MA 01888




_______________________________________________________


     Honey and Tears is a terrific solo disc from Richie Parsons, lead singer/guitarist in Unnatural Axe.  With songs like "Love Letter," "Evelyn," "Nowhereville" and opening track "When Fall Begins," we get the softer, pop side of Richie, and so well it works with cascading instruments and vocal sensitivity as on "Hey Little One."     "When You're Dancing" is not "No Surfing in Dorchester Bay," it is mature and elegant as this is an album of love songs infused with lots of ACP -  adult contemporary punk.

       "Summer" might be the sequel to "Can't Wait for the Summertime" with its guitar that the Tornados ("Telstar") almost veered towards, and the Ventures would over-indulge in.  Nicely placed -as are the acoustics on final track "Right On Time."  "Blue Sands"  works well with "Summer" and is an adult beach party song for Antette Funicello and Frankie Avalon 20 years after the American International Pictures teen craze of the 60s. A lament with lots of layered guitars after the surfboards have been put away and the aforementioned Dorchester Bay is safe from the rowdy twenty-somethings. All that's needed is Roxy Music's Andy Mackay  to bring his Wild Weekend on board

     "Mix Tape" is a strong splash of melody and rock and roll drive that takes jangling guitars and puts them underwater, think the Flamin' Groovies tempting the grunge fates but not falling over the cliff.    Parsons should push this song on hundreds if not thousands of radio stations ...it has all the elements  A cover of Lou Reed's "Love Makes You Feel" works, always nice to cover the master.


Here's Lou's Version on YouTube   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qhr1rSaBT7s

Here's Richie Parsons' rendition https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ta560Bz4KD4

Play both videos at once and see what happens, even if you have one 3 seconds behind the other.

Extra credit goes to: "Mix Tape," "Evelyn" and "Love Letter" - they are most outstanding.

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/richieparsons

________________________________________________________________________

Remember - Outrospection is a way to get to know oneself by developing relationships and empathetic thinking with others.



TERRY KITCHEN
The  Post-American Century






TITLE: The POST-AMERICAN CENTURY
Artist: Terry Kitchen
Review by Joe Viglione

     Former Loose Ties band member Terry Kitchen returns after 2014’s book/cd combo Next Big Thing presenting his The POST-AMERICAN CENTURY album. Ten songs with a bonus track of the one minute twenty-four second “One More Sunset,” this collection is reminiscent of Gordon Lightfoot’s worldy point of view, with lots of hope tucked inside the melancholy mood of some of the material.
    With a Francisco Gonzalez  cover on the gatefold, straight out of `1968’s Charlton Heston, the original Planet of the Apes, the Boston area/New England folk veteran mixes upright bass, mandolin and harmony vocals to “So Much More To Home.” This is perfect music for WUMB, the mega-station at UMass Boston which should embrace and highlight this material.  “Sequel” evoking feelings from the past, this new American century in need of or searching for a label, is the closest thing to a title track with the album’s name repeated in the refrain.   Kitchen keeps his cover of Neil Diamond’s “I’m A Believer” under four minutes.  The approach is Ric Ocasek of the Cars back in his MIlkwood phase on Paramount Records, a tight rhythmic strum turning the Monkees pop classic into John Sebastian playing post-concert in a coffee shop.  Very nice approach.
    The material goes from three to five minutes, story songs like “Rock of Ages” perhaps the other side of the aforementioned Diamond’s “"Brother Love's Travelling Salvation Show"  - the singer telling a story from the audience’s perspective.  “One By One” is not the Randy California songs from the 1990s, one of the final great moments for the band Spirit, but you can hear California singing this, an elegant bit of outrospection, if you will.  The longest track, “Tall Against the Wave,” at 5:15 is a civil war lament, a story-song a la Gordon Lightfoot’s “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” and a perfect medley song begging for “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” to follow.  Perhaps live in concert.  “Eternity,”a video from the album, gives a nice look into the serious fun Terry’s crew bring to this sophisticated and splendidly performed music.

Terry Kitchen’s author information on each song
About the SONGS on Terry Kitchen's
The Post-American Century
1. "So Much More to Home"  My friend Andy Dunn and I were talking at the Falcon Ridge Folk Festival a few years back. His wife was extremely pregnant, and my wife and I had just bought a house, so even though we were surrounded by great music we were both being pulled by thoughts of home. We took a break from the crowd and wrote this song. With Bob Harris on mandolin and Mara Levine on harmony.

2. "Sequel"  If the 1900s are regarded as "The American Century," what does make the 2000s? Lots of great songs were written in the '60s about freedom and finding ourselves. I got to wondering about how all those lives turned out, and got this song. With Mara Levine on harmony.

3. "Perelli's Barbershop"  As places where men gather to wait their turn, barbershops are filled with "guy" magazines - Car & Driver, Sports Illustrated, and maybe even a Playboy. In those innocent pre-internet days when I was growing up, a Playboy was a big deal indeed, especially to a ten year old boy.
With Roger Williams on Dobro.

4. "Tall Against the Wave"  April 2015 marked the 150th anniversary of Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox, effectively ending the Civil War, and I was surprised how little attention it got. It might be worth remembering in this time of un-civil politics how bad it can be. Lee had assigned Joe Johnson the task heading off Sherman on his march back from Georgia, and they clashed at Bentonville, North Carolina, when the war was all but over. With Amy Malkoff on harmony and Chris Devine on fiddle.

5. "Stay Forever"  We do our best to be caring and brave when confronted with the loss of a loved one, but behind the façade we're angry, hurt, confused and scared. Or at least I am. With Phyllis Capanna on

harmony and Brice Buchanan (from my '80s band Loose Ties) on guitar.
6. "Rock of Ages"  When I visit Nashville I stay on my friend Steve's couch, and down the block is a very small and humble-looking church. Even though I'm an atheist I appreciate the fellowship and community people can find there when they really need it. With Roger Williams on Dobro, and Brice Buchanan and Deede Bergeron on harmony.
7. "Eternity"  When we're young we race to grow up, then when we get there we futilely try to slam on the brakes. Good luck. A country duet in the tradition of Porter and Dolly, with Mara Levine on duet vocal.
8. "One by One"  In a country with an African American president, it's tragic that far too many still pay the ultimate price for merely having the wrong color skin. The list keeps growing ‒ Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Jordan Davis, Clementa Pinckney and on and on. Pete Seeger taught us we shall overcome, but it has to start in the hearts of each of us. With Mara Levine on harmony.
9. "Mommy Come Quick"  My mother (Peachy to her family and friends) passed away last fall on her 86-and-a-half birthday. As her Alzheimer's progressed, she lost more and more of her abilities, and our roles reversed. Seeing her so childlike made me remember my own young childhood, when I was helpless without her. With Don Barry on upright bass.
10. "I'm a Believer"  In my novel Next Big Thing, the fictional band Shadowland's first big hit is a Monkees cover, pissing off songwriter/main character Mark Zodiac. Will life imitate art?

11. "One More Sunset" (hidden cut)  A
few more reasons to stay forever.



New video  "ETERNITY"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owbfxo8v-BU
Terry's touching duet ballad with vocalist extraordinaire Mara Levine from Terry's new CD The Post-American Century. With Norman Zocher on pedal steel and John Coffey on bass. Video shot by Wayne Martin and edited by Chris Constantine.


The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnyeqyCiLdo


Jaimie Brockett 
Remember the Wind and the Rain
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-pqYthi6-0

Joe South "Rose Garden"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fin085kq2d4 
_____________________________________________________________


Terry's Blog

http://terrykit.blogspot.com/2015/02/next-big-thing-audio-book.html






http://www.tmrzoo.com/2014/61431/music-review-songtrack-book-next-big-thing-novel-terry-kitchen

Music Review: Songtrack to the Book ‘Next Big Thing’ A Novel by Terry Kitchen




It’s fantastic that author/songwriter Terry Kitchen has released the free CD that comes in the back of his novel, Next Big Thing, as a solo disc – Songs from Next Big Thing. The ten-song disc absolutely stands on its own as a work of art,

Take track 4, “Second Glance,” four minutes and forty-eight seconds of inviting and pleasant guitar work from Brice Buchanan (also on harmony vocal) and Kitchen, who also plays bass, percussion and lead vocal. Opening with a pretty guitar and shaker accompaniment (and what sounds like a keyboard) Terry’s insightful lyric dances alongside the guitars.

Two of the tracks were recorded in the 1980’s by Terry’s notable Boston band, Loose Ties, Song 7 was produced by Kearney Kirby of the November Group at Baker Street in Watertown, 1984. The “funk mix” is four minutes and twenty six seconds of “sex so strong, just kills all else” – perfect for the 1987 James Bond flick, The Livin Daylights, which A-ha got to do (instead of Charlie Farren, whose own “the Livin’ Daylights” song is much, much better. Loose Ties band mates Bill Kuhlman (bass, vocal), the aforementioned Buchanan, Chris Peeler on synth drums and Terry Kitchen on guitar all provide a steady and intriguing blend. Find the credits to this CD on Terry’s webpage.
Track 9, “Get Out of My Novel” is, of course, complementary to the book. This is the Loose Ties as well, recorded by Jeff Shirley at the Somerville Media Action Project, Somerville, MA, 1988. It’s a perfect snapshot of 1988 Boston rock, reminiscent of Dutch Courage, another group from the region who rocked out in the 1970s.

There’s a special place in my heart for “Ghosts Of Kenmore Square” – especially having lived it since 1974. Deirdre Bergeron and Brice Buchanan add harmony vocals to Terry’s guitar and voice, Brice adding some guitar as well. It’s a slow-tempo march that tells one perspective of life down at the Rathskellar on 528 Commonwealth Ave. Superb.

Opening tune, “Killing Time,” has an eerie mood, Kitchen utilizing this feel to good effect across the CD with his guitar musings. Would actually be a nice soundtrack song to scriptwriter Danny Garcia’s 2014 movie Six Bullets to Hell, filmed on the same set in Spain as 1966’s The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and other Clint Eastwood “spaghetti westerns.”

“Animal to Animal” by Shadowland (Kitchen with Chris Peeler from Loose Ties on drums) could be the long lost sequel to Lou Reed’s “Animal Language” from Sally Can’t Dance. It’s a percussive-heavy, guitar angling episode that shows Kitchen’s musical diversity and imaginative essays.
“Dogtown Rain” could be Norma Tanega (“Walking My Cat Named Dog”) meets ? & The Mysterians. Quaint, solemn Lovin’ Spoonful-ish Americana with a nice harmonica from Kitchen.
Salsa-flavored “Second Glance” is half-sung spoken word set to a pensive melodic scheme until the hook kicks in while “Same Heart Twice” has Rebecca Lynch’s vocal grooving in a country style over Kitchen’s simple strums, harmony vocal and bass work.

This “songtrack” has a multitude of styles, which is a natural, of course, for the songs accompanying the ideas in the novel…and sets the stage for filmmakers to build a movie around the chapters and each song.



EDITORIAL SYNOPSIS FROM PUBLICIST

Synopsis
'80s Boston rock novel by scene veteran Terry Kitchen After years in the sub-basement of Boston's teeming underground music scene, Lennon-spectacled wordsmith Mark Zodiac is used to enduring abuse, neglect and indifference for his music. And that's just from his own band. But when he's thrust into the spotlight on the night of Shadowland's record release concert, the crowd tunes in as never before - much to the chagrin of Mark's best friend/Shadowland's star-in-waiting Will. With the record moving up the charts, their ego-librium gives way as Mark strives to keep control of his music without selling his soul in the process. Complicating Mark's world is the shadow of the loss that both drives and haunts him, even as he attempts to find love amidst the graffitied alleyways of Kenmore Square. On the eve of stardom, Mark must decide if being the Next Big Thing is really the most important thing. At once disarmingly absurd and heartbreakingly real, Next Big Thing combines the gritty backstage vibe of Roddy Doyle's The Commitments with the emotional thawing heart of Jay McInerey's Bright Lights Big City, and every page crackles with the kinetic current of true rock'n'roll. "Kitchen gets all the details right - I felt myself back in the Rat, the Channel and the other clubs of that era - but most of all, he gets the underlying sense of adventure. Next Big Thing reminds me just how much it all meant and how exciting it was."-Brett Milano, author of The Sound of Our Town: A History of Boston Rock & Roll Best known as a contemporary folk singer/songwriter, Terry Kitchen is a 30-year veteran of the music business, as a recording artist, award-winning songwriter, journalist, and former production assistant for Rounder Records. Next Big Thing, based on his years with the '80s Boston band Loose Ties, is his first novel.

'80s Boston rock novel by scene veteran Terry Kitchen! After years in the sub-basement of Boston's teeming underground music scene, Lennon-spectacled wordsmith Mark Zodiac is used to enduring abuse, neglect and indifference for his music. And that's just from his own band. But when he's thrust into the spotlight on the night of Shadowland's record release concert, the crowd tunes in as never before - much to the chagrin of Mark's best friend/Shadowland's star-in-waiting Will. With the record moving up the charts, their ego-librium gives way as Mark strives to keep control of his music without selling his soul in the process. Complicating Mark's world is the shadow of the loss that both drives and haunts him, even as he attempts to find love amidst the graffitied alleyways of Kenmore Square. On the eve of stardom, Mark must decide if being the Next Big Thing is really the most important thing. At once disarmingly absurd and heartbreakingly real, Next Big Thing combines the gritty backstage vibe of Roddy Doyle's The Commitments with the emotional thawing heart of Jay McInerey's Bright Lights Big City, and every page crackles with the kinetic current of true rock'n'roll. "Kitchen gets all the details right - I felt myself back in the Rat, the Channel and the other clubs of that era - but most of all, he gets the underlying sense of adventure. Next Big Thing reminds me just how much it all meant and how exciting it was."-Brett Milano, author of The Sound of Our Town: A History of Boston Rock & Roll Best known as a contemporary folk singer/songwriter, Terry Kitchen is a 30-year veteran of the music business, as a recording artist, award-winning songwriter, journalist, and former production assistant for Rounder Records. Next Big Thing, based on his years with the '80s Boston band Loose Ties, is his first novel.
Product Identifiers
ISBN-101491096896
ISBN-139781491096895

Key Details
AuthorTerry Kitchen
Number Of Pages256 pages
FormatPaperback
Publication Date2013-08-18
LanguageEnglish
PublisherCreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Dimensions
Weight15.9 Oz
Height0.6 In.
Width6 In.
Length9 In.

  Publication Date 2013-08-18 Language English Publisher CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform Dimensions Weight 15.9 Oz Height 0.6 In. Width 6 In. Length 9 In.

Archives

December 2004   March 2005   April 2005   September 2005   November 2005   January 2006   May 2006   September 2006   May 2007   June 2007   July 2007   September 2007   October 2007   November 2007   January 2008   March 2008   April 2008   July 2008   January 2009   March 2009   April 2009   August 2009   August 2010   September 2010   October 2010   November 2010   December 2010   January 2011   February 2011   March 2011   April 2011   May 2011   July 2011   August 2011   September 2011   October 2011   December 2011   January 2012   February 2012   June 2012   July 2012   August 2012   September 2012   October 2012   November 2012   December 2012   January 2013   March 2013   April 2013   May 2013   June 2013   July 2013   August 2013   September 2013   November 2013   December 2013   January 2014   April 2014   May 2014   June 2014   July 2014   August 2014   September 2014   October 2014   November 2014   December 2014   January 2015   February 2015   March 2015   April 2015   May 2015   June 2015   July 2015   August 2015   September 2015   October 2015   November 2015   December 2015   January 2016   March 2016   April 2016   May 2016   June 2016   August 2016   September 2016   October 2016   November 2016   December 2016   January 2017   February 2017   April 2017   May 2017   June 2017   September 2017   October 2017  

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Subscribe to Posts [Atom]